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ZimParks launches kapenta project at Tugwi-Mukosi

THE Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority has launched a multi-million-dollar kapenta fish project at Tugwi-Mukosi Dam in Chivi as efforts continue to ensure that the country starts accruing socio-economic benefits from Zimbabwe’s largest inland water body.

About 100 000 fingerlings have since been stocked in the nearly $300 million reservoir for breeding purposes under the kapenta fish project.

The project is being rolled out under Government’s Command Fisheries programme.

In his address during a ceremony to mark the official stocking of kapenta at Tugwi-Mukosi last week, Masvingo Minister of State for Provincial Affairs Senator Josaya Hungwe hailed the Command Fisheries programme for its role in accelerating socio-economic development in the country.

Senator Hungwe said Command Fisheries was being intensified countrywide at a time Zimbabwe was celebrating the successful implementation of the Command Agriculture programme which saw farmers delivering at least two million tonnes of maize to the Grain Marketing Board in the 2016-17 farming season.

“Following the successful launch of the Command Agriculture programme, Government has embarked on other programmes to complement it. The Command Livestock, Command Fisheries and Wildlife Management and other programmes such as Command Water Harvesting have been initiated countrywide,” said Sen Hungwe.

He said Command Agriculture and Fisheries were welcome in the province which is home to many underutilised water bodies.

“The Command Fisheries programme today has brought the much admired kapenta fish to Masvingo. This is not only historical, but it is a great milestone for the province.”

Senator Hungwe said for a long time, Lake Kariba was the only source of kapenta fish in Zimbabwe.

The fisheries industry has been producing approximately 9 000 tonnes of fresh kapenta equating to 3 000 tonnes of dry weight per annum.

The industry has also been contributing about $15 million to the national economy annually.

“All these economic benefits are now coming to Masvingo province with Tugwi-Mukosi Dam set to be the second largest water body after Kariba Dam to be stocked with kapenta fish.”

The introduction of kapenta at Tugwi-Mukosi is expected to boost the ecology at Zimbabwe’s largest inland dam which was officially commissioned in May last year.

Most of the fish of economic significance and presence in the lake do not generally occupy the open pelagic water and is therefore vacant.

A number of dams across the country have also benefited from the Command Fisheries project and in Masvingo a cumulative 225 000 fingerlings have already been stocked in four different dams in the province.

Siya Dam in Bikita received 1 000 fingerlings, while Mabvute and Nyatare in Zaka received 2 000 and 2 500 fingerlings respectively.

Dealer of Specially protected Wildlife Arrested

Ntandoyenkosi Ndlovu (36), from Kasibi village, Matetsi in Hwange was arrested for illegally possessing and dealing a live pangolin for one thousand dollars at Matetsi River Bridge on the 19th of March 2018.

The arrest was confirmed by the police on Sunday.

“Information was received from a usual informant about a man who had a live pangolin, selling it to any willing buyer for one thousand dollars.”

The information was confirmed by the dealer himself when he was contacted undercover, and a deal was struck.

On the 19th of March at 8pm, three of National Parks’ Investigations Officers, together with one officer from Mineral and Border Control Unit went to Matetsi River Bridge where the supposed buyers were to meet with the accused to complete the deal.

With the advantage of the element of surprise they were able to apprehend the accused, along with the pangolin alive in a brown sack which the accused was carrying it in.

Accused Ndlovu was charged of breaking section 128 (1) (b) of the Parks and Wildlife Act Chapter 20; 14 “Illegal possession/ dealing of live pangolin.’

The apprehended pangolin was used as an exhibit at Hwange Magistrate court on the 20th of March 2018, and was later released back to the wild.

The accused pleaded guilty at his court appearance and his he will be sentenced on the third of April 2018, with the allowance for him to present any special circumstances that may have been at par.

Apprehended live pangolin.

Pangolins are specially protected animals under the Parks and Wildlife Act 20; 14, therefore the expected sentence could go as far as 12 years in prison.

The unnamed informant is to be rewarded for his courage and timeliness to report the information which saved the pangolin.

Insert by – Munkuli Godfrey | Bulawayo Regional Office | Western Region

A Guide to Tracking Rhinos in Zimbabwe – March 04, 2018

I felt like a downright trailblazer as I trekked through the grassy plains of Zimbabwe’s Matobo National Park, hopscotching over fallen branches and crunchy, dried leaves.

Up ahead, a group of fellow explorers had formed a tight semicircle, with their eyes fixed to the ground and grins stretching from ear to ear. I picked up my pace and caught up, only to be met with a steaming pile of … poop.

The fanfare had nothing to do with the dung itself, but rather what it represented. These droppings were fresh; they had been left by an adult southern white rhino that was likely just minutes ahead of us on the trail. At that moment, we made a silent pact: move swiftly, remain quiet and, hopefully, see one of these majestic creatures up close.

Don’t let the name fool you — white rhinos aren’t “white,” but rather light gray in color. They are also much larger than their darker counterparts and have a longer head and wider mouth, according to Jay Parmar, owner of U.S.-based tour operator Wander Africa. Another helpful identifier? You guessed it: the animal’s poop. While the waste of black rhinos is made of splint-like materials — usually chopped off at a 45-degree angle — white rhinos will produce a much grassier manure.

The park, which is located in central Zimbabwe, has populations of both black and southern white rhinos. We were tracking the latter — a species of grazers introduced to the area in 1964 from neighboring South Africa, according to Emmerson Magodhi, tourism manager for Matobo. White rhinos are found in multiple parts of the park, while black rhinos are confined to a special game area. An Intensive Protection Zone distinction protects these creatures from poachers, and armed security rangers patrol 24 hours per day (we were accompanied by one such ranger throughout our visit).

Matobo also attracts tourists for its many hiking trails, unique landscape and rich history; the land features rock art left by ancient dwellers and is home to the grave of British imperialist Cecil John Rhodes. It’s also only about a 40-minute drive from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second-largest city and an international hub serviced by South African Airways, Ethiopian Airlines, Emirates and more.

Tracking rhinos here is much like a game of hide-and-seek, and it’s a task made easier by using the animal’s “natural” clues, and the fact that these so-called “hiders” tend to move very slowly, only changing sleeping positions once every 30 to 40 minutes.

“Rhino tracking is one of those rare opportunities in life for tourists to come close to an animal that is a ‘world over’ while in its natural environment,” Magodhi said. “It is one of the most adventurous experiences one can do in their lifetime.”

We walked for just five minutes more, and then we saw them: two white rhinos, their slate-gray hue serving as a form of camouflage against a background of towering granite rocks. The pair patiently allowed us to play paparazzi — not a bad ending to our grown-up game of hide-and-seek.

Booking Tips
A rhino-tracking experience needs to be booked with the park at least one or two days in advance. Those interested in reserving this should contact park officials at malemetourism@gmail.com or matoboparks@gmail.com.

Emmerson Magodi – extract from travelagewest – http://www.travelagewest.com/Travel/Adventure-Travel/A-Guide-to-Tracking-Rhinos-in-Zimbabwe/#.WqqFhGZ7HOQ

World Wildlife day

This year’s World Wildlife Day in Zimbabwe will be commemorated jointly with the 28th  Africa Environment Day and Wangari Maathai Day. The event will be hosted by the  Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife authority, Environmental Management Agency,and Forestry Commission on the 3rd of March 2018, at the Africa Unity Square in Harare.

ZIMPARKS – 23 February 2018 – INVITATION TO TENDERS

Parks and Wildlife Management Authority invites tenders from suitable and reputable suppliers.

 

The Request for Proposals (RFP) may be collected from Parks and Wildlife Management Authority Head Quarters upon payment of US$10.00 non-refundable for other tenders and $30 for supplier registration. Bids in sealed envelopes should be addressed to The Procurement Committee, Parks and Wildlife management Authority, P.O Box CY140 Cause-way Harare or can be delivered to The Procurement Committee, Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, Corner Borrowdale Road and Sandringham Drive Harare, not later than 10.00hrs on the closing date shown below

 

TENDER NUMBER DESCRIPTION CLOSING DATE
PWMA/02/2018 SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF CAMPING EQUIPMENT 20.03.2018
PWMA/03/2018 SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF A MEDICAL AID FUND SOFTWARE SYSTEM 20.03.2018
SUPPLIER REGISTRATION INVITATION FOR 2018-2020 SUPPLIER REGISTRATION 20.03.2018

 

NOTE :  Each envelop should be clearly marked with the tender number upon submission. 

The closing Date for submission of Bids is 20 March 2018 at 10.00am. Bidders are free to witness the opening of the tender on the closing date and time at The Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, Head Office Lecture Theatre, Corner Borrowdale Road and Sandringham Drive

The End of An Era…. after 36 years of service

The End of An Era…. after 36 years of service to Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Authority, (15 years at Mana Pools) Norman Monks Put on his National Parks uniform today for the last time. Through good and also extremely difficult times, Norman has served with diligence, passion and integrity always keeping in the forefront that “whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God”. He is thankful that he had the opportunity and privilege to look after God’s beautiful country here in Zimbabwe.

Thank you to all who supported Norman along the way!

(Insert from Facebook. Friends of Mana)

ZIMPARKS – INVITATION TO TENDER, TENDERER NUMBER PWMA/01/2018

Parks and Wildlife Management Authority invites tenders from suitable and reputable suppliers of patrol boots.

 

The Request for Proposals (RFP) may be collected from Parks and Wildlife Management Authority Head Quarters upon payment of US$10.00 non-refundable fee. Bids in sealed envelopes should be addressed to The Procurement Committee, Parks and Wildlife management Authority, P.O Box CY140 Cause-way Harare or can be delivered to The Procurement Committee, Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, Corner Borrowdale Road and Sandringham Drive Harare, not later than 10.00hrs on the closing date shown below

 

TENDER NUMBER DESCRIPTION                  CLOSING

   DATE

PWMA/01/2018  SUPPLY AND DELIVERY 13.03.2018
OF 2500 PATROL BOOTS

 

The closing Date for submission of Bids is 13 March 2018 at 10.00am. Bidders are free to witness the opening of the tender on the closing date and time at The Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, Head Office Lecture Theatre, Corner Borrowdale Road and

ZIMPARKS – INVITATION FOR SUPPLIERS REGISTRATIONS FOR 2018-2019

The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority would like to invite prospective and current suppliers to apply for approval and be registered as the Authority suppliers.

The Suppliers’ application forms are to be obtained from the Cashier’s desk at a fee of US$30. These should be completed in full and submitted to the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority in a Sealed Envelop and clearly marked the type of business applied for.

Insurance

Cleaning services

Contractors (thatching, roads repairs)

Printing Services

Hardware and building materials

Grocery and toiletries

Branded and General stationery

Pest Control and fumigation

Office furniture,  fixtures and fittings

Medical supplies and equipment

Telephone supply, repairs and maintenance

Fuel and lubricants supplies

Clearing, Freight and Forwarding

Cellular and mobile phone

Vehicle and/or boats sales, spares, service, repairs and accessories
Electrical supplies, repairs and maintenance

Two way radio communication

Borehole siting, drilling, installation repairs and maintenance
ICT and related office equipment

Protective Clothing  and footwear

Building Contractors

Liquid and Solid Waste removals

Equipment repairs and maintenance
Supplies, Repairs and Maintenance of firefighting equipment
Locksmiths
Plumbing and reticulation installations and repairs
Transporters and Households removals
Signwriting and posters
Reals Estate and valuers
Other (Specify)

The above documents should be addressed to;

The Procurement Committee

 Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority

 P.O Box CY 140

 Causeway, Harare

 Or hand delivered to;

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority Corner Borrowdale Road and Sandringham Drive.

NOTE: CLOSING DAY 20 MARCH 2018

NB: If you have registered in 2017, you are still valid upto 2019. There is no need to re-register.  

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Zimparks guns down hippo in Nyanyadzi

August 31, 2017August 31, 2017
Inset from Zimpapers. THE Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority last week shot dead a hippopotamus that was damaging winter wheat in Nyanyadzi. The hippo, which had a calf, is believed to have escaped from Save Conservancy. ZPWMA ordered the shooting of the hippos after traditional leaders in the area reported that it was damaging crops and endangering lives. ZPWMA officer, Mr John Danfa, said they were still hunting for the calf which is believed to have found habitat along Save River. “Usually hippos move up and down rivers during the rainy season. We believe the two escaped from Save Valley Conservancy. They were both females and they do not usually click if there is no male. “They are believed to have separated. We received reports from traditional leaders in Hot Springs and Nyanyadzi that these hippos were feeding on wheat and crops in their fields.” “People’s lives were endangered so the authorities ordered its killing. The first time we attempted to kill it, it was in the company of so many cattle and could not do anything. Our officer teamed up with villagers to track it until last week when it was shot down in Nyanyadzi”. The officer is said to have fired 12 shots before the hippo died. The meat was shared by villagers. One of the villagers in Dirikwe village, Mr Tapiwa Munyati, said: “This hippo was becoming a threat to human lives in the area. It was being spotted near homes at night. “There are vegetable gardens along one of Save River’s tributaries where it was being spotted.“We were told that hippos do not like light and the danger was that lives would have been lost.” “A villager survived death by a whisker recently when the hippo strayed into his homestead.“He went out of his house to investigate when his dogs were barking. He had a torch and the hippo advanced towards him. “Fortunately he managed to escape the attack and notified other villagers and the village head. We are appealing to the responsible authorities to make sure that the remaining one is also killed,” said Mr Munyati.