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PHOTOGRAPHIC SAFARI CONCESSIONS AUCTION.

Duly instructed by the Director General, of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA), Desired Liaison Auctioneers will be conducting a

PHOTOGRAPHIC SAFARI CONCESSIONS AUCTION.

VENUE: Cresta Lodge, Sango Conference Room, Harare.

DATE: Friday the 6th of October 2017 at 10:30hours

ON SALE: PHOTOGRAPHIC SAFARI CONCESSIONS AUCTION

AVAILABLE SITES

  1. View Point in the Victoria Falls National Park
  2. Fothergill Island on Lake Kariba under Matusadona National Park
  3. Popoteke Picnic site in Kyle Recreational Park
  4. Bompst in Kyle Recreational Park
  5. Matoa Pan in Hwange National Park
  6. Bumbusi Site under Sinamatela Camp in Hwange National Park
  7. Robins Camp Chalets, Lodges and Restaurant in Hwange National Park
  8. Deteema Camp in Hwange National Park
  9. Tshakabika under Sinamatella Camp in Hwange National Park
  10. Dabashuro under Sinamatella Camp in Hwange National Park
  11. Glenclova in Kyle Recreational Park
  12. Fishermen’s Creek in Kyle Recreational Park
  13. Mashayeni in Mana Pools National Park
  14. Kasawe Spring in Mana Pools National Park
  15. Mashuma Pan in Mana Pools National Park
  16. Lake Front Picnic Site in Lake Chivero Recreational Park

CONDITIONS OF SALE

  1. A participation deposit of USD$20,000.00 (twenty thousand United States dollars) for all sites will be required to obtain a buyer’s card.
  2. The deposit is refundable if all sale conditions are met.
  3. Payment is strictly Cash or Bank Transfer.
  4. Registration fee of $50.00 will be paid to PWMA through the auctioneer.
  5. Prospective bidders are encouraged to visit the sites to familiarize themselves with the attractions that are available on the sites.

For more information contact:

Desired Liaison Auctioneers

10 Stevenson / Telford Roads

Graniteside

Harare

Tel: 04 757664

0712 401 528

0772 403 799

Email: rdziya@desiredauctioneers.co.zw

desired@africaonline.co.zw

Two poachers killed at Matusadonha

 

Insert from Zbc 

The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) rangers have shot and killed two poachers after an exchange of gunfire at Matusadonha Mountains.

Two pieces of elephant tasks have been recovered while two of the poachers managed to escape.

Zimparks’ well-trained rangers who were on a regular patrol of Matusadonha Mountains exchanged gunfire with four poachers’ yesterday afternoon.

Two of the poachers were shot and killed during the exchange.

The poachers are still to be identified and the case has since been reported to the Zimbabwe Republic Police.

Zimparks public relations manager, Mr Tinashe Farawo confirmed the incident adding the rangers who had exhausted other avenues to arrest the poachers had to resort to the exchange of gunfire resulting in the unfortunate loss of lives.

The Zimparks public relations manager highlighted the incident should serve as a warning to would be poachers that the authority will do everything in its powers to protect the country wildlife heritage.

The country continues to face worrying trends of poaching with calls for the private sector and communities to partner Zimparks in the fight against poaching scourge.

ZIMBABWE PARKS AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES IN ANTI-POACHING ACTIVITIES.

Communities that reside adjacent Hwange National Park have sent a clear message to poachers that any form of illegal harvesting of the country’s wildlife resources has no room in society. This follows a citizen’s arrest in Gwayi area close to Hwange National Park where Innocent Nyathi,41, arrested by the community . His colleague, who is yet to be identified, escaped and is on the run.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority  said the two were allegedly found with 3 kilogrammes of cyanide in their possession when they were apprehended. The arrest was effected by a Gwayi man who later called Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority offices. The accused person has been sentenced to nine years imprisonment for illegal possession of raw ivory weighing 4 kilogrammes. The accused person appeared before Hwange Provincial Magistrate Rosemary Dube while Memory Musaka appeared for the state. The accused person pleaded guilty and was given a mandatory nine years in prison.

Meanwhile Munashe Chandake aged 25years of Jenyedza St Rujeko, B. in Masvingo was arrested by a joint anti-poaching operation team comprising Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, Zimbabwe Republic Police, ZRP and anti- tracking specialist, ATS . The team managed to avert a  would be indiscriminate killing of wildlife in one of the water holes, when they were arrested Chindake who was found in illegal possession of 2 kilogrammes of cyanide and has since appeared before Masvingo Magistrate where he was remanded in custody for continuation of trial. Chishakwe ranch is home to a variety of wildlife species.

In yet another incident, Petros Kunyeti was sentenced to 12 months in prison for the illegal possession of cyanide by a Guruve Magistrate, Artwell Sanyatwe for illegal possession  500 grammes of cyanide. Kunyeti was carrying the cyanide intending to administer it in order to kill elephants in Mana Pools, Lower Guruve when he was apprehended by a crack team from the ZRP Minerals and Border Control Unit and the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority. Vanestancia Musiiwa was prosecuting.

The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority is warning members of the public on how extremely dangerous cyanide is to humans, domestic and wild animals as it causes death within seconds after being exposed to it.

The Authority will forever remain grateful to its stakeholders who have assisted in fighting poaching in the country adding that wildlife crime needs an all stakeholder’s approach if the war against poaching is to be realised.

Zimbabwe first female relieves memories

Growing up in the rural areas, in the 1970s every little girl then aspired to be a teacher, nurse or just being a full time housewife. With no mentor to look up to for advice on which career to pursue, opportunities were even more diminished for rural girls, who could not dream beyond the boundaries of their owncommunities.

That was the same predicament that Mrs Doris Tom found herself in soon after completing her Ordinary Levels in 1978.

Luckily for her, an advertisement that she stumbled on in one of the newspapers charted her career as a female ranger – a profession that no one knew anything about in her home area of Matopo.

Her decision to apply for the challenging and gruesome profession, despite her father’s reluctance, was the turning point in her life.

She might not have earned recognition within her own community then, but Mrs Tom carved her own piece of history by becoming the first female black ranger in Zimbabwe.

“I ventured into unknown territory, with little or no information of what being a ranger entailed, but I rose above the occasion.

“The time I spent in this field bears testimony to my undying passion for the profession that has shaped my life and values,” said Mrs Tom in an interview recently.

Mrs Tom is the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Authority head Management Services, and has been with the organisation for 34 years from the time she joined the institution in 1982, as a ranger.

She is among the few people who have been strategically involved in its several transformational stages and was also instrumental in some of the changes that the National Parks boasts of today.

Some of the changes included the designing of the shoulder titles for the authority and ensuring that the institution would have four regions from the previous three as part of the organisation’s efforts to effectively manage its operations.

“I have grown with the organisation and it’s quite gratifying to note that conditions of services particularly for female rangers continue to improve from the time that I joined the wildlife authority” she reminisced.

Reliving memories of her first five years as a ranger which was predominantly a male terrain, Mrs Tom said life was indeed tough.

Apart from the gruelling physical tasks, which were part of her training, she had to deal with gender stereotyping from male colleagues and in some instances racial slur from some of her supervisors, who were white.

“During training, the majority of men were not keen to work alongside the two of us – myself and a white female ranger – and would often pass unsavoury comments meant to discourage us,” she said.

She recalled one incident soon after completing her two-year diploma programme when the Range Rover that she was using broke down.

She called the office for assistance, but one of her white supervisors, stopped a male colleague from assisting her, arguing that the training she had received was sufficient enough to enable her to repair the truck’s gearbox.

Luckily for her, having grasped all the concepts taught during her training, Mrs Tom managed to fix the gearbox. However despite her feat, she still needed assistance to put the gear box back.

“I encountered several such situations, but I could not afford to quit. I had come a long way with my course, I just could not abandon everything,” she revealed.

Her situation did not get better when she got pregnant with her first child, because she still had to execute her task, including going on patrol.

Rather than discouraging her, all the challenges she faced reaffirmed Mrs Tom’s resolute to soldier on in a domain where men had proven their supremacy.

“I could not suddenly back down and admit that I had failed. My two-year training, which was both practical and theoretical, had taught me what to expect in terms of the gruelling tasks that lay ahead,” she said.

Having covered modules on mechanics, weaponry, map reading, drilling, identification of animals and plumbing, Mrs Tom was mentally prepared, although she had hoped for support from her male colleagues.

However, her determination to leave a mark where no female had traded was not without rewards and job satisfaction. It also deepened her understanding and appreciation of the animal kingdom and conservation tourism.

“I know each and every one of the 47 stations owned by Parks and I have headed all the four regions in Zimbabwe, including working in the Zambezi Valley, which is notorious with poachers and also houses Zimbabwe’s big five.

“I can safely say, I have been there and done this and that,” she said with a chuckle.

Looking back, Mrs Tom believes she made the right choice and the wildlife authority has since rewarded her for her perseverance, determination and endurance in an area that had not been chartered before by black females.

In addition, Parks now have several female rangers whose numbers continue to grow as more women than before embrace the profession.

At 58, with the better part of her life having been spent in the jungle, Mrs Tom would one day want to retire, a decision she would take with grace.

“One day I will retire and go home, knowing that I accomplished my task and would relish the idea of having more women, walk in my shoes,” said Mrs Tom, a widow with four children.

When she is not on the internet researching on animals or on global anti-poaching initiatives, Mrs Tom is a hopeless romantic, who gets the thrills in going through Barbara Cartland’s collection of novels.

ZIMPARKS CONCERNED AT THE RATE OF HUMAN WILDLIFE CONFLICT CASES IN ZIMBABWE.

ZIMPARKS CONCERNED AT THE RATE OF HUMAN WILDLIFE CONFLICT CASES IN ZIMBABWE.

 

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority expresses concern at the high rate of human wildlife conflict cases involving mainly elephants especially in the farming season. No day passes without Zimparks offices receiving a report of elephants that stray into communities that reside adjacent wildlife areas. The just ended Christmas period saw communities dedicating more of their time to protecting their fields from elephants as opposed to spending quality time with their families.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority spokesperson Caroline Washaya-Moyo said one such area is Makore Village in Gokwe North where a total of 18 elephants were found in the community on the 27th of December. A report was quickly made to Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority and a team comprising Zimparks and Gokwe North rural district council, (RDC) was immediately deployed to manage the situation. Two professional hunters constitute the team that was deployed and will only leave the area when the elephants have been driven out.

She added  that the community feared that their crops which are doing well were under attack, this following the rains that have been received countrywide. The availability of water almost everywhere is good a reason for elephants to travel long distances. Human life has been threatened and as a result the Authority has scaled up efforts to carrying out awareness campaign programmes with the communities on how to behave around elephants. The elephants are suspected to have travelled from Matusadonha National Park and follow the Sanyati River.

 

In a related development, on the 23rd of December in Bhatiti Area of Chikombedzi in Chiredzi South two cheetahs nearly attacked an 8 month old baby who was playing at her parents’ homestead. The cheetahs had earlier preyed on goats. The community was brave enough and armed with axes, dogs and bayonets, chased the two cheetahs.

The community successfully managed to separate the two cheetahs with one fleeing into Gonakudzingwa Farms while the other which had become aggressive was trapped in a tree, after killing a hen. After four hours the same cheetah returned to the area and the community was left with no option but to kill it in order to save their lives.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers continue to work with Chiredzi South community in ensuring that their day to day lives are not distrupted.

Still in the same province two lions are reported to have attacked and killed three cattle in Chigwite Village, Save Valley conservancy. Zimbabwe Parks and Widlife Management Authority rangers and officials from Save Valley Conservancy are in the area to manage the problem. What concerns Zimparks about such attacks is that the owner of the cattle had made every effort to pen his cattle and the lions could not resist the tempatation.Predators such as lions, hyenas and cheetahs are devising new hunting areas opting to attack softer targets.

Zimparks urges communities to immediately report the presence of wildlife in their area to the nearest Zimparks offices, Zimbabwe Republic Police, ZRP or the local traditional leadership.

Meanwhile a Zambian poacher was shot and killed, during the Christmas period, at Nyamuomba sub camp in Rifa section Morongora, Hurungwe Safari Area. This happened when Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers on patrol exchanged fire with four suspected Zambian poachers. The other three escaped. The case was reported to ZRP Chirundu.

The following items were recovered

·     One shot gun

·     8 live rounds, 303

·     One impala carcass

Investigations are continuing.

Two poachers shot and killed during a contact. Hwange National Park

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers working together with Zimbabwe Republic Police, ZRP, have shot and killed two Zimbabwean poachers during a contact in Hwange National Park .This was after Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, ZIMPARKS rangers, and Zimbabwe Republic Police, ZRP, reacted to gunshot sounds at Main Camp, Hwange National Park mid-morning today,10/01/2016.According to the particulars of one of the poachers it was concluded that he is from Nkayi while the other could not be immediately identified because he had no identification particulars on him.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority said the following items were recovered,

1×450 rifle

2x live catridge

1x empty catridge

3 pairs of elephant tusks

1x adult bull elephant

1x axe

1x stone file

2x elephant tails

5 kilogrammes mealie-meal

Salt

1x pot

4x cellphones.

Investigations are continuing.

31 year old sentenced to 3 months for illegal sale of game meat.

Hwange Provincial Magistrate Sharon Rosemani on 27 December sentenced Thabani Shoko 31, of Gamba village, Lukosi in Hwange, to 3 months in prison with labour, for the illegal sale of game meat. Memory Munsaka was prosecuting. He was arrested on the 25th of December at Cross Dete where he was illegally selling dried kudu and impala game meat to truck drivers.

He was arrested for contravening section 59(b) of the Parks and Wildlife Act chapter 2014 of 1996 which is the removal of game meat from one place to another without a permit. Shoko was found in possession of 44 bundles of dried game meat weighing 10 kilogrammes. He confessed to poaching the meat in Sinamatella, Hwange National Park.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority advises the public who wish to venture into game meat selling to approach Zimparks offices for assistance on how to acquire the permit. The Authority however warnes members of the public against illegally selling the plant adding that they risk prosecution. The flame lilly is a specially protected indigenous plant and anyone  found and or seen with it without proper papers risks prosecution, this according to section 51 of the statutory instrument 362 of 1990.The illegal sale of the flame lilly is rife during rainy season.

Zimparks concerned at the rate of human wildlife conflict cases in Zimbabwe.

ZIMPARKS CONCERNED AT THE RATE OF HUMAN WILDLIFE CONFLICT CASES IN ZIMBABWE.

 

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority expresses concern at the high rate of human wildlife conflict cases involving mainly elephants especially in the farming season. No day passes without Zimparks offices receiving a report of elephants that stray into communities that reside adjacent wildlife areas. The just ended Christmas period saw communities dedicating more of their time to protecting their fields from elephants as opposed to spending quality time with their families.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Mnagement Authority spokesperson Caroline Washaya-Moyo said one such area is Makore Village in Gokwe North where a total of 18 elephants were found in the community on the 27th of December. A report was quickly made to Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority and a team comprising Zimparks and Gokwe North rural district council, (RDC) was immediately deployed to manage the situation. Two professional hunters constitute the team that was deployed and will only leave the area when the elephants have been driven out.

She added  that the community feared that their crops which are doing well were under attack, this following the rains that have been received countrywide. The availability of water almost everywhere is good a reason for elephants to travel long distances. Human life has been threatened and as a result the Authority has scaled up efforts to carrying out awareness campaign programmes with the communities on how to behave around elephants. The elephants are suspected to have travelled from Matusadonha National Park and follow the Sanyati River.

 

In a related development, on the 23rd of December in Bhatiti Area of Chikombedzi in Chiredzi South two cheetahs nearly attacked an 8 month old baby who was playing at her parents’ homestead. The cheetahs had earlier preyed on goats. The community was brave enough and armed with axes, dogs and bayonets, chased the two cheetahs.

The community successfully managed to separate the two cheetahs with one fleeing into Gonakudzingwa Farms while the other which had become aggressive was trapped in a tree, after killing a hen. After four hours the same cheetah returned to the area and the community was left with no option but to kill it in order to save their lives.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers continue to work with Chiredzi South community in ensuring that their day to day lives are not distrupted.

Still in the same province two lions are reported to have attacked and killed three cattle in Chigwite Village, Save Valley conservancy. Zimbabwe Parks and Widlife Management Authority rangers and officials from Save Valley Conservancy are in the area to manage the problem. What concerns Zimparks about such attacks is that the owner of the cattle had made every effort to pen his cattle and the lions could not resist the tempatation.Predators such as lions, hyenas and cheetahs are devising new hunting areas opting to attack softer targets.

Zimparks urges communities to immediately report the presence of wildlife in their area to the nearest Zimparks offices, Zimbabwe Republic Police, ZRP or the local traditional leadership.

Meanwhile a Zambian poacher was shot and killed, during the Christmas period, at Nyamuomba sub camp in Rifa section Morongora, Hurungwe Safari Area. This happened when Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers on patrol exchanged fire with four suspected Zambian poachers. The other three escaped. The case was reported to ZRP Chirundu.

The following items were recovered

·     One shot gun

·     8 live rounds, 303

·     One impala carcass

Investigations are continuing.

ZIMBABWE PARKS AND WIDLIFE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY, ZIMPARKS, SUCCESSFULLY EXPORTS 35 AFRICAN ELEPHANTS TO CHINA

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority would like to announce to its valued stakeholders and the people of Zimbabwe that the Authority has successfully exported 35 African elephant from Hwange National Park to China on the 23rd of December 2016. This was done after a team from Zimparks and a chief inspector from Zimbabwe National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ZNSPCA) travelled to China to inspect the facilities and conditions under which the elephants were going to live. The team visited and assessed Shanghai Exhibition Park, Beijing Wildlife Park and Hangzhou Wildlife Park. Zimparks was satisfied that the translocation process could go ahead. CITES and national rules and regulations pertaining to the live sales were religiously followed. The process of crating and ground transport and loading of elephants into the air cargo was monitored and observed by various stakeholders who comprised national security agencies and Zimbabwe Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, (ZSPCA). Destinations for any live sales undergo thorough suitability assessments, a pre-requisite for CITES, before any translocations occur and follow ups are made to any destinations to ensure compliance to international best practice. Throughout the process, the Zimbabwe National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was involved. The 35 elephants that were translocated to China were escorted as per CITES requirements by a wildlife specialist, wildlife veterinarian and elephant keeper.

Translocation of elephants from highly concentrated areas to other local national parks   is an ongoing process and is in line with the current national elephant management strategy. Relocation to other areas will be done in phases. First phase will focus on Sebungwe region which has such protected areas as Chizarira National Park and Chirisa Safari Area. Assessment of some of the areas have been done in terms of ecological and security requirements.

It is not a secret that the exercises to translocate wildlife is capital intensive, thus requires funding. Zimbabwe believes that wildlife conservation should pay for itself. Live sales of elephants to international destinations are done to generate financial resources for conservation programmes. It is also not a secret that Zimbabwe has been slammed with trade restrictions on hunted trophies of some wildlife species and raw ivory that make it almost difficult to utilise our wildlife to fund conservation. We are therefore turning to friendly countries to extract value out of our wildlife. Zimbabwe, unlike other countries has a unique wildlife conservation funding system in that no amount is budgeted for conservation in the national budget.Zimbabwe has an elephant population of over 83000 which is the second highest in Africa and the greatest population in the North-West Matabeleland. Hwange National Park is carrying over 45000 elephants against an ecological carrying capacity of 15000.Gonarezhou National Park  is one of the areas that is over populated by elephants and is carrying a population which is above 11 000 individuals against an ecological carrying capacity of around 5 000. This is an indication of the country’s best elephant management programme. However these figures, in Hwange National Park, indicate what is termed localised overabundance. This scenario has led to severe ecological damage that has affected other wildlife species. The high elephant population results in severe environmental degradation, loss of bio-diversity and increased competition for scarce resources resulting in some elephants being pushed to the peripheries of the Park, a situation that increases their vulnerability to poaching and also heightens human wildlife conflict. The cost per unit area to manage such animals particularly protection and water provision has escalated dramatically as the elephant population increases. .

To manage the ever increasing elephant population, Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority has embarked on a population reduction exercise which seeks to reduce elephant populations in Hwange National Park. Three options exist on how to manage the elephant population: Culling, translocations to low population regions and conducting live sales. The option of culling has not been considered because there is little or no value that will be extracted from the elephants.

The Zambezi Valley and Sebungwe Regions are two of the elephant ranges that have experienced declining elephant populations. The major reason for such declines include human encroachment into wildlife zones resulting in habitat loss; increased poaching. Elephant management plans have been crafted and are being implemented to address these challenges being faced in elephant conservation. As a result priority to restock will be focussed on these two regions.

 Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority has gone on a recruitment drive to increase coverage of the regions, in such areas as North West Matabeleland, where we have the highest number, and the Sebungwe Region where elephants will be relocated in the near future. Thus enhancing protection of wildlife. Education and awareness programmes are being rolled out to communities in an effort towards making communities value wildlife. Increased intelligence gathering has also been instituted through recruitment of intelligence details as well as increased international cooperation through structures such as Interpol to ensure timeous information gathering to fight wildlife crimes.  The CAMPFIRE programme is also undergoing a revamp to ensure that communities realise maximum value from wildlife thus incentivising their protection. All these interventions are being done as a precursor to reintroducing wildlife, particularly elephants in these major elephant ranges. It would be futile to immediately restock the other ranges through translocating before addressing the root causes of the elephant and other wildlife species decline. In the short term there will be translocations to the Sebungwe and Zambezi Valley in a phased process.

Three poachers shot in two days.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority confirms the death of another poacher in Morongora. The poacher, a suspected Zambian was shot and killed during a contact yesterday, 11/01/2017 in Hurungwe Safari Area. The suspected Zambian poachers who were three in total and during a contact the other two escaped while one was killed during an exchange of fire. This follows the death of two Zimbabwean poachers who were shot and killed in Hwange National Parks during a contact with law enforcement officials and rangers.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority said the following items were recovered from the scene where the suspected Zambian poachers were found…

458 rifle and 15 live rounds

A specified hunter’s knife

Miner’s torch and two batteries

Cell phone and airtel sim card

2 jackets

Three black long polythin plastics and food stuff with Zambian labels were also recovered.

Investigations are continuing.

The rate at which poachers are gaining illegal entry into protected areas is indication of the amount of pressure the country’s wildlife resources is being put under. The Authority however warns strongly would be poachers that illegal entry into these protected areas will have dire quensequncies. The mandate of the Authority is to protect and conserve the country’s wildlife resources and rangers patrolling the Parks Estate will do so at whatever cost. Zimparks further appreciate the level of commitment, dedication and alertness being exhibited by our rangers who despite resource challenges and varying weather conditions, continue to remain focussed on their duties.

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Zimparks guns down hippo in Nyanyadzi

August 31, 2017August 31, 2017
Inset from Zimpapers. THE Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority last week shot dead a hippopotamus that was damaging winter wheat in Nyanyadzi. The hippo, which had a calf, is believed to have escaped from Save Conservancy. ZPWMA ordered the shooting of the hippos after traditional leaders in the area reported that it was damaging crops and endangering lives. ZPWMA officer, Mr John Danfa, said they were still hunting for the calf which is believed to have found habitat along Save River. “Usually hippos move up and down rivers during the rainy season. We believe the two escaped from Save Valley Conservancy. They were both females and they do not usually click if there is no male. “They are believed to have separated. We received reports from traditional leaders in Hot Springs and Nyanyadzi that these hippos were feeding on wheat and crops in their fields.” “People’s lives were endangered so the authorities ordered its killing. The first time we attempted to kill it, it was in the company of so many cattle and could not do anything. Our officer teamed up with villagers to track it until last week when it was shot down in Nyanyadzi”. The officer is said to have fired 12 shots before the hippo died. The meat was shared by villagers. One of the villagers in Dirikwe village, Mr Tapiwa Munyati, said: “This hippo was becoming a threat to human lives in the area. It was being spotted near homes at night. “There are vegetable gardens along one of Save River’s tributaries where it was being spotted.“We were told that hippos do not like light and the danger was that lives would have been lost.” “A villager survived death by a whisker recently when the hippo strayed into his homestead.“He went out of his house to investigate when his dogs were barking. He had a torch and the hippo advanced towards him. “Fortunately he managed to escape the attack and notified other villagers and the village head. We are appealing to the responsible authorities to make sure that the remaining one is also killed,” said Mr Munyati.